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Glossary Of Terms

Glossary of Frequently Used Terms, Acronyms and Abbreviations

Within the service delivery system for people with developmental disabilities, the following acronyms and abbreviations may be used to describe services:

ABLE:

The Stephen Beck, Jr. Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act (P.L. 113-295) added Section 529A to the federal tax code to enable eligible individuals with disabilities to save money in a tax-exempt account that may be used for qualified disability expenses while still keeping their eligibility for federal public benefits.

ACTT: (This looks to be to just in Frederick County)

Augmentative Communication Technology Team

Age-out:

The time when students become too old to receive educational services under IDEA (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act) regulations

ALU:

Alternative Living Unit

BP:

Behavior Plan-A plan designed to reinforce and shape adaptive behaviors, and to provide an approved means to safely intervene when behaviors that are dangerous to self and/or others are exhibited. (from here: http://dda.dhmh.maryland.gov/Pages/Developments/2015/BPSProtocol%202013.pdf)

Case Management:

Service that helps people identify their strengths and needs in order to coordinate and locate community specialized services. This may include helping people make plans regarding financial decisions, personal relationships, etc.  Also known as service coordination or resource coordination.

CCS:

Coordinator of Community Services (formerly known as Service Coordinator or Resource Coordinator) — a case manager who supports people in learning about and connecting to resources in their community, planning for their future and assessing the need for services and supports.

COMAR:

Code of Maryland Annotated Regulations

Continuing Adult Education:

Non-credit class or classes designed to enhance personal growth and development.

CP (Crisis Prevention):

The second priority category for services funded by Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA).  People in this category have been determined to have an urgent need for services, but do not qualify for Crisis Resolution. The person qualifies for this category by meeting one or more criteria as stated in the regulations.

CR (Crisis Resolution):

The top priority category for services funded by DDA. To qualify for this category, the person has to be in crisis by meeting one or more criteria as stated in the regulations.

CSLA (Community Supported Living Arrangements):

Residential supports that enhance a person’s opportunity for community participation and enables them to exercise choice and control over their lifestyles.

Current Request:

The third or lowest priority category for services funded by Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA). To qualify for this category, the applicant shall indicate at least a current need for services.

Day Supports:

Services which provide structured daily activities for individuals with developmental disabilities. There are several options under these services; Supported Employment, workshops, activity center; and volunteer work.

DDA (Developmental Disabilities Administration):

A primary funding agency for persons with developmental disabilities. Students remaining in school until the age of 21 are referred to DDA the year prior to exiting the school system. Once the referral has been made, a DDA representative will contact the family for a home visit to discuss services which may be accessed after exiting the school system.

DDA-funded Services:

Any services which are purchased with the use of state (and, in some instances, federal) money through the Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA).

“DD” Eligible:

One of two eligibility categories in which a person needs to meet the following criteria: Have a physical or mental condition other than a sole diagnosis of mental illness.  The disability is considered severe and chronic in nature.  The disability was manifested before the age of 22.  The disability results in the person being unable to live independently.  The person needs assistance to plan and coordinate services.

DHMH:

Department of Health and Mental Hygiene DORS (Division of Rehabilitation Services):  A state funded agency that provides leadership and support to enable individuals with disabilities to live independently.  DORS may provide vocational training, vocational assessment, and possible job linkages. Students receiving special education services are referred to DORS the year prior to exit or graduation. Once the referral has been made, a DORS counselor will contact the student and his or her parent to discuss options and formulate a plan. DORS is the point of entry and initial funding source to access STEP services.

DSS:

Department of Social Services

E & A (Eligibility & Access):

The process by which a person with a disability applies to the Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) for services.  Eligibility is based on definitions in Maryland State Law, Health-General, Title 7, and Developmental Disability Law.  These services are not an entitlement service. Individuals must apply and be determined eligible for DDA services.

Enclave:

A group of individuals working at the same community-based site with direct supervision.

Family Support Services:

Assistance provided to individuals and their families to enable greater participation in the community and enhanced quality of life. Supports may include: case management, skills training, purchase of adaptive equipment, respite, etc.

Fiscal Intermediary:

An agency through which money from the Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) can be sent to make payment for services on your behalf.

Funding:

Money made available to agencies to provide services to individuals. Futures Planning (used interchangeably with Person-Centered Plan or Essential Lifestyle Plan) is the process of sharing and gathering information on the dreams, desires, wants and needs of people in order to develop an Individual Plan specifically tailored to their lives. A comprehensive plan may include personal, financial, and legal components. Generic Resources: Services that are available to everyone in the community, not specific to people with developmental disabilities.

Future Need Registry:

A database kept by the Developmental Disabilities Administration for individuals who have been determined eligible for services but do not have a current need for them.

IBMP (Intensive Behavioral Management Program):

The specialized program which helps people who have behavioral issues, their families, the school system and other agencies. IBMP does an extensive evaluation of the person in all their regular environments and makes recommendations. Sometimes they can also provide specialized training, extra staff and respite services, based on the evaluation.

IEP:

Individual Education Plan (school plan)

Individual Budget:

The total cost of service per year for an individual to buy the supports needed or desired.

Individual Support Services:

Assistance provided to individuals over 21 and their families to enable greater participation in the community and enhance quality of life.  Supports may include case management, skills training, purchase of adaptive equipment, respite, etc.

IP:

Individual Plan (adult providers through Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA)

IPE:

Individual Plan for Employment (division of rehabilitation services)

Informed Choice:

Having the information and understanding about a situation prior to making a decision.

ISP:

Individual Service Plan (individual support service provider)

Job Coach:

A person who provides job training for a worker in a competitive location.

Medical Day Care:

Provides monitoring and therapies in a structured setting for people who have a medical need. Therapies are provided based on the need of the person being served. In some cases, attending medical day care on a temporary basis can help someone regain skills after a serious medical incident.  These programs are not restricted to DDA funded agencies.  There are generic programs, usually run by the aging service community, which may be accessed by people with disabilities.

Natural Supports:

People, places, activities in our community and home that we depend on that are not paid services.

Non-DDA Service:

Services that are not funded by the Developmental Disabilities Administration. Section 8 housing and public education services are two examples of non-DDA services.

One-Time Only:

A small and limited amount of funding through the DDA to help an individual purchase a one-time service or product.

Other Funding Sources:

Funding may also be available from other sources such as:

  • Department of Mental Health and Hygiene
  • Medical Assistance, Medicare or individual’s private insurance.

Provider Agency:

Personal supports provide regular personal assistance, support, supervision, and training to assist the individual to participate fully in their home and community life. These supports can be provided in the participant’s own home, family home, in the community, and at an individual competitive, integrated work site.

Monies used to purchase supports (services or products) to assist an individual or family.

Quality Assurance:

A way to look at the quality of the services being delivered to a person with developmental disabilities who receives funding from Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA).

Residential Support:

Services which offer supervision and assistance to individuals in their home. “Home” may also include a group home, alternative living unit (ALU) and Community Supported Living Arrangement (CSLA).

Resource Coordination:

Used interchangeably with Service Coordination: also known as case management.

Respite Care:

Short-term care provided to a person for the purpose of providing relief for the parent or primary caregivers. Respite care can mean many things to a parent/caregiver: time to relax, time to spend alone, time to spend with other family members, or assistance when emergency care is needed.

Robert Wood Johnson:

A foundation that provided a three-year grant to promote the Self-Determination Project which started in 1997.

Self-Advocate:

Those individuals who have chosen to assert their right to choose what is best for them.

Self-Determination:

Practicing self-determination means that the individual makes the decisions about his or her life, supports, and how his or her budgeted funds are spent.

Service Coordination:

Professionals who assist people with developmental disabilities to plan for and locate services to meet people’s preferences and needs. Also known as resource coordination or case management.

Social Security Administration – Supplemental Security Income (SSI):

To be eligible for SSI based on a medical condition a person must: Have little or no income or resources.  Be considered medically disabled, Initially not be working or working but earning less than the SGA level (Substantial Gainful Activity = average countable earnings over $800 per month).  Students may apply for SSI on their 18th birthday. They are considered a family of “one” and their income alone is taken into consideration.

Support:

A term given for the different ways to meet peoples needs.  Supports are typically people, places, resources, and activities in our community.

Support Staff:

Persons hired by individuals, families, or agencies to provide requested services.

Supported Employment:

Provides assistance for people who are working jobs in the community. The help can be in the form of job coaching, educating co-workers or negotiating with employers to help the person be as independent as his or her abilities allow.

Transitioning Youth:

A funding source through the Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) to assist eligible individuals in the transition from school to work after the age of 21.

WTC:

Workforce Technology Center (in Baltimore)

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